Jamie Trafficanda

Career Success Program Rolls out Across Colorado

Evan Richardson of Fort Meyers, FL described himself as the typical disengaged high school student. It wasn’t until he was exposed to the plethora of industry credentials in the tech sector that he realized school could be rewarding and relevant

While women have made significant gains in some STEM fields over the years, such as biological sciences, progress has been slow since the 1960s
Jamie Trafficanda

Colorado’s Challenge: Getting More Women and Girls in STEM

It’s been nearly 25 years since the toy company Mattel received extensive criticism for producing a talking Barbie doll that lamented, “Math class is tough.” The toy, and many other aspects of our popular culture, have consistently reinforced the idea

Jamie Trafficanda

The Colorado READ Act Delivers Results for Kids

Building a strong workforce pipeline begins well before students enter high school. Early literacy is a little known but key factor in ensuring student success throughout their lives. “Research shows that 3rd-grade literacy is one of the best predictors of

Jamie Trafficanda

2016 Colorado Talent Pipeline Report: 10 Takeaways

Our partners at the Colorado Workforce Development Council released the 2016 Colorado Talent Pipeline Report last month. This annual report is a workforce landscape gold mine, highlighting the future of jobs in Colorado and issues surrounding our state’s workforce and post-secondary

Jamie Trafficanda

CO Succeeds Jumps in the Shark Tank: Watch the Mic Drop

What could you do in just two minutes? Could you face a room full of philanthropic “sharks” to secure funding to turn your big idea into a reality? That’s just what Colorado Succeeds’ own Scott Laband and Shannon Nicholas did

Jamie Trafficanda

P-TECH Schools: A Win for Colorado Students

Colorado’s workforce is changing, and a high school diploma is no longer enough to guarantee future success or employment. By 2020, 74% of Colorado jobs will require some postsecondary education. But currently, less than a quarter of Colorado’s students receive